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strategy

2019 China-New Zealand Year of Tourism: Things to know

A mix of academics, policymakers, tourist attraction agencies and operators came ...

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finance

Beijing and Shanghai Remove Bank Account Approval Requirements

Beijing and Shanghai are the latest cities to remove the permits required for opening ...

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profile

Ambassador Wu Xi's speech at the China Business Summit

E ngā mana, E ngā reo, E ngā rau rangatira mā, Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, ...

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commentary

Minister Parker Speech at the China Business Summit

Tēnā koutou katoa. Da jia hao. Good morning distinguished guests, ladies and ...

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general

Mandarin language assistants welcomed

Forty eight Mandarin Language Assistants were officially welcomed to New Zealand ...

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KPMG Special Report on China's State-Owned Entities

China General Interest

Some of the largest and most influential businesses in China – and now the world – are controlled by China’s central government, yet this is a model that remains a mystery to the business world outside of China. Most of these State-owned enterprises (SOEs) were originally set up along Soviet lines in the 1950s;1 over the past 30 years, the Chinese government has been progressively reforming their operation and management.

Today, in many respects these companies look like multinational companies. Some are listed on overseas stock markets, and some feature prominently on lists of the world’s largest corporations. Look a little closer, however, and one can see that these Chinese business giants still maintain traditional SOE characteristics, including how they are managed and led; their corporate objectives; their stakeholders; and their corporate culture and ethos.

This month’s China 360 discusses the unique SOE phenomenon, in particular the centrally-managed SOEs in China and how they compare to international peer companies. We also look at reasons for the longevity of this special business model, and offer insights on how the SOE model may adapt going forward.

The full report can be accessed here: 

State-owned entities: From centrally-planned origins to hybrid market competitors